Jump to content
Black Chicken Studios Forums

TwoHeavens

Members
  • Content Count

    236
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    10

TwoHeavens last won the day on January 18

TwoHeavens had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

12 Good

About TwoHeavens

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 02/28/1990

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    54HTG7169341191
  • Interests
    Military history, marksmanship, toy soldiers

Contact Methods

  • Skype
    monsterwithnoname

Recent Profile Visitors

474 profile views
  1. Oliver Hazard Perry and his harem flagships USS Lawrence and Niagra will ride again! Heh... the Morgana really wouldn't know what to do with that.
  2. I'm outraged, outraged at this display of tabloid journalism. Damn society pages are like jackals but with worse table manners.
  3. Now that has the potential to be incredibly amusing.
  4. Rocketry was a far more wide spread and commonly communicated concept than the obscure concept of a hovercraft. If it wasn't obscure then Cockerell wouldn't get the credit as the father of such devices for the SR-N1 and it's follow up commercial implementations (and later military applications like the US LCAC) in the West. Even then model rocketry as a hobby wasn't really a thing until the 1950s, the the companies that ran and run DIY ads to this day in some cases not really coming about until the late 50s/early 60s. This didn't stop enterprising young men like Homer Hickham and his Big Creek Missile Agency from making their own rocket fuel and cutting deals with adult machinists to have nozzle sections machined for them, but that's a horse of a very different color than ordering away for a kit from a magazine. I even went to dig up two archived back issues of Amazing Stories from 1939. The ads ranged from dandruff cures, get rich quick schemes, false teeth and razor blades to literary agents*, radio operator training and regular ads for a Popular Aviation magazine. No DIY kits of any kind though I don't have the rest of '39 to check. And of course you can always pull the fictional world card, but BCS has always been somewhat serious about it's historical accuracy and this particular detail was so far out of left field it made my eyes roll. Unless someone's got an ad laying around to prove otherwise, the whole thing is still predicated off a US advertisment from if I had to guess, the 70s, maybe the 60s, that stayed around mostly unchanged well in to the 1990s when I was reading similar comics and magazines. *Sounds a bit odd compared to everything else but when you consider Amazing Stories was a launch pad for a lot of now legendary sci-fi writers it makes sense.
  5. Well we've discussed this in the discord, might as well bring it to the forums. Also gives me a chance to write it up more coherently. J'accuse sir! Anachronism most foul indeed. While no one is disputing the ancient and venerable art of obnoxious advertising to sprogs in magazines comparable to "Amazing Stories" through out the era, most of the more iconic items we remember from what are now vintage advertisements were post war innovations. The now sadly somewhat forgotten American "pet" that is Sea Monkeys for example didn't exist as a product until 1957. Which is a bit convenient because the modern hovercraft wasn't really a thing until 1959, and Christopher Cockerell didn't coin the term until at least 1955. Similar ground effect craft had existed previously, with some of the features we now recognize as part of the Hovercraft showing up. Specifically Finnish and Soviet military prototypes, neither of which got particularly far. Wikipedia also lists an aerofoil style flying boat, but while that concept use similar physics, I'd say they're rather divergent in their practical use of said physics. So the idea of military prototypes from the ever open to discussion and the exchange of ideas freely with the world Soviet Union, and Finland influencing a set of DIY blue prints for tykes in the English speaking West with basic access to machine tools seems a bit... out there to say the least. While the venerable Konstantin Tsiolkovsky deserves unending amounts of credit more than he received in life for his pioneering work in spacecraft design, aeronautics and more, his one paper on movement via air cushion was theoretical math with a rough design of an air cushion train. Not quite the hovercraft Lexington's looking for. Nor would or did he refer to it by the same name. Nor would the air train concept he devised really be worked on in any serious sense until the 1960s. One could argue that Charles Fletcher beat Cockerell to the punch with his WW2 invention of a similar machine, but considering it was still classified even when Cockerell was applying for his patents in the mid 1950s, and the invention itself didn't occur until later in the war, we can probably assume that wasn't influencing blue prints being sold to the industrial minded child or warship with a knack for tinkering either. In conclusion, I find it wildly unlikely, if not completely implausible that either the term hovercraft, or really the concept of the hovercraft in a form where one can simplify it to something kids can make by quietly tearing apart Mom's vacuum with Dad's tools from the garage, would be available circa 1939.
  6. Rawa should make a return I think, I'm expecting some things in the post.
  7. I can't say how pleased I am by Triomphant's triumphant return. On to the business of the day however! Ladies, gentlemen and other associated flora and/or fauna. I propose we push for Belles we've not seen in next to anything. I know the temptation will be to rush right towards fan favorites but the duos were pretty charming fan service in that regard. Let's give the other girls their shot at pre launch fame... is what I want to say. But I'm having trouble thinking of some of those interesting Belles that didn't quite catch in the interviews where more... aggressive personalities... shall we say tended to rule the roost and I'd kill for a peek at Nagato. So I'll hold my vote till I see what other captains come up with.
  8. Well you know my opinion on bureaucratic terminology. No worries about anyone besides a few singular members of Allied intelligence reading those documents though, most of us can't even read our own bureaucratic nonsense with our minds intact never mind advancing to the eldritch horror that is German bureaucratic communications. Honestly I think the whole thing's an international plot to bring around the end of the world... but that's a different discussion... or is it? Hmmm... note to self ask ONI to investigate the whereabouts and movements of US bureaucrats leading up to 1 September, 1939.
  9. Maybe Schleswig-Holstein forced her crew to hoist the banner of the Reichsmarine after the initial engagement with Despair was over. Korky, wouldn't the Kriegsmarine be more likely to adopt the mythic interpretation of events? Especially once the rest of the German government gets ahold of it. Walk├╝ren isn't just a sailor's nickname, it's the official term from the German government, which itself is happy to support just about anything that pushes it's internal mythology.
  10. As Von Lipstig points out, with Greek words are frequently more than the sum of their parts. Apoandrasis potentially already has a meaning, and I think it's probably what they were going for versus Dr. Yurimom's admittedly detailed analysis. A spirit of a warship taking on the flesh, or at least something like it of a far more human incarnation and walking amongst us... and gods by the way we think of them, then and now the Belles are decidedly not. They're far too human for that. If incarnation is a god taking on flesh, apoandrasis would be more along the lines of a god becoming a man by way of actual loss of immortal/divine status instead of just taking on human form. Sounds like exactly what I'd expect a bunch of over educated, over paid bureaucrats to call a fairy tale in their government documents to me.
  11. Discord link now available here: https://discord.gg/GhUxkSt
  12. Hey Legate, tell them we want more Polish ships! Shiro's been regaling us recently withe ballad of the card shark submarine Belle ORP Wilk for example.
  13. Considering the failure to care for the USS Ling, a retired submarine, intended to be conserved for historical reasons, is on the hands of private parties, compared to mass disrespect for their active hulls by their parent navy I'm not sure I'd consider the situations comparable.
  14. Some of you may know that I was briefly in Japan with my wife for a vacation/honeymoon combo. For part of the trip we decided to pick some things we really wanted to do, hers with staying at a ryokan and making me play tour guide (which admittedly I'm pretty good at.) and mine was to pay a visit to Yokosuka and the Mikasa. I'm pleased to report she's in fine shape, though presently under some active restoration. They're entirely redoing her decks for example which are mostly wood. The museum itself was excellent, and if you're out that way she's more than worth your time to visit as one of the "Three Great Museum ships" (The other two being HMS Victory and USS Constitution*) https://imgur.com/a/g24jCEH *Fun game for Americans who make the trip, there's a minor error in the museum display for ol Iron sides. See if you can find it.
  15. There's got to be one serious one... though given how much attention the Russians paid to their sub fleet by my understanding, perhaps the girls are just returning the favor. Kinda ironic how the tides would turn for the Soviet Navy post war... though frankly they don't treat those girls much better. I'd post photos from Olenya Bay or even some of the actual proper Russian ports modernly, but Panay would either cry, declare personal war on Russia, or both, and I don't want to be responsible for either of those things.
×
×
  • Create New...