Jump to content
Black Chicken Studios Forums

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'zoe melis'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Academagia
    • Gaming FAQ
    • General Discussion
    • Support
    • Writer's Corner
  • Victory Belles
    • General
    • Writer's Corner
    • Ships, Belles, & History
  • Holdfast: Record of the Dwarven Kingdoms
    • General
  • Scheherazade
    • Gaming FAQ
    • General Discussion
    • Support
  • Black Chicken Studios
    • Announcements
    • Affiliates
  • City of Ivory & Jade: an Ars Magica Forum Game
    • General Discussion
    • The Library

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 3 results

  1. I wrote it. It is perhaps the first piece of literature written in English that is inspired by Lollianus's "Phoenicica", Clark Ashton Smith's "The Maze of Maâl Dweb", and "Secret in the Stones", by Erica Farber and J.R. Sansevere - although its Zoe does not fall into evil when she rushes out into the rain! Read it here, if you want: https://archiveofourown.org/works/35952910 @Legate of Mineta, I hope that the story is appreciated. If you or the Team like it not - it uses swearing in Latin - then I can delete it or replace "hascineque" with "scelesteque". I hope that the Team can include the concept of a school dance for students old enough to date on the Dance of Pixies in future instalments of the game.
  2. Ever since I learned that Zoe Melis is a student whose native language is an Eluminian dialect whose real-life equivalent is a form of Latin, I have been fascinated about how to incorporate such an idea into content that I write about her without descending into pig-Latin. So, for the benefits of people writing about Zoe Melis and other people from Cimone, I provide the following suggestions, which guide me. Nouns are conjugated according to Old Latin. This allows the nouns to look and sound more Greek, incidentally. Thus, servos would be the nominative singular of the noun that in standard Latin is servus. Be guided by the following Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Latin, but choose forms that are distinguishable. This means that, for example, puellāī would be reserved for the dative singular, while puellais would be the genitive singular and puellās would be for the accusative plural. Of particular note to me, this would mean that a vocative singular would be preserved if writing in a font capable of using non-English characters. Zoe would be addressed by her parents as "puella" but would refer to herself as "puellā". This form of Latin has many consonant clusters where standard Latin has only consonants: e.g. iouxmentom (iūmentum, "beast of burden"); losna (lūna, "moon"), cosmis (later cōmis, "courteous"); stlocum, acc. (locum, "place"). Most notably, du /dw/ becomes b: duenos > duonos > bonus "good"; duis > bis "twice"; duellom > bellum "war". In order to further diversify the language, I decided to incorporate aspects from Faliscan, a real language very closely related to Latin. In practise, this involved the following things. 1. h becomes f and f becomes h: fe instead of he (here), and hil- instead of fil- as the stem for the noun son/daughter. 2. certain nouns whose nominative singular forms in Old Latin are -os instead have -o endings (in addition to Faliscan-inspired features). Thus Singular Plural Nominative HILEO HILEI Vocative HILE HILOI Accusative HILOM HILōS Genitive HILī HILōM Dative HILō HILEIS Ablative HILōD HILOIS Locative HILEī HILEīS 3. The nouns senatus (senate) is zenatuo, and conjugates as follows. Singular Plural Nominative ZENATUO ZENATUEI Vocative ZENATUE ZENATUOI Accusative ZENATUOM ZENATUōS Genitive ZENATUī ZENATUōM Dative ZENATUō ZENATUEIS Ablative ZENATUōD ZENATUOIS Locative ZENATUEī ZENATUEīS I am no Tolkien in many things, including skill in languages, but I hope that these words from me may guide other people.
  3. So, in 2001 was published a book named "Secret in the Stones" (Tales of the Nine Charms #2) by Erica Farber and John R. Sansevere with a character named Zoe. Their Zoe was approximately the same age as Zoe Melis, also sought to be popular and wealthy, and found herself in a place where much magic was practised and many people were richer, more powerful, and more beautiful than she was. The two Zoes were both willing to ignore social norm associated with virtue in order to get ahead in life. Their Zoe was also evil, working with evil beings in order to get what she wanted, interested in jewels, and willing to use mind-control in order to help her evil allies (these later three traits I associate with Zoe Melis's fellow Hedi student Sima Venesico). I am aware that "Secret in the Stones" is a very obscure book, and I would be not surprized if I were to learn that Black Chicken Studios has never heard of it. But I find the similarities to be inspiring and depressing. Inspiring because they have encouraged me to write Zoe Melis in a slightly darker, amoral light - as a character whose story could, in theory, lead her to making the sorts of deals which Zoe in "Secret in the Stones" made. I do not write Zoe Melis's lack of interest in serving gods as a manifestation of this amorality, though. Depressing because "Secret in the Stones" came out in 2001 and ended with a cliff-hanger ending, and the series has yet to be completed - nor will it be, apparently. So, I hope that Academagia will not be similarly unfinished.
×
×
  • Create New...